Thursday, October 6, 2011

Jobs

Yesterday's news, and today's, was the death of Steven Jobs. The majority of what I read today about his death was in tribute to the man and his legacy, but there were a few people who either despised him for some reason or were annoyed that his death upset their expectations of what they'd find in traditional and social media. The latter group of people are, in my view, truly selfish and bathed in deep self-appreciation; the death of an icon does NOT, in their view, merit interrupting their routine. I have absolutely nothing but disdain for such attitudes.

I read a transcript, and viewed a video, of Jobs' 2005 commencement address at Stanford. It was low-key, understated, and brilliant. It made me think about my life. Steve Jobs was a brilliant and very observant man.

7 comments:

bev said...

Yes, I have seen some snippity posts about Jobs here and there. I thought to mysekf - weel, I would rather be hearing about Jobs for a few days than, say, the whole Michael Jackson court case thing, or Sarah Palin nor running, or a bunch of other dumb news stories. I know I'm biased on this topic - having almost exclusively worked with Apple computers in publishing since 1984, and these days with an iPad - but the simple truth is that Jobs ked the way into the digital age within which we all communicate. He continuously raised the bar for the whole tech industry. For a large and growing number of people, barely a day goes by that we don't benefit in some way from our phones, ipods, ipads, or computers. Can we not take a few moments to acknowledge the genius behind the devices that have beckme such an integral part of our lives?

Taradharma said...

Exactly, Bev. My mother, who is not a Mac person or a popular culture person, was really surprised at the plethora of news stories on Job's death. Not upset, just surprised. And yes, he was a genius, and I'd much rather hear about his life and his contributions that MJ or Palin. Sheesh.

John Swinburn said...

Yes, it's a bit disturbing to know that people either don't recognize Jobs' contributions or don't care. Or they think it's inappropriately unhip to mourn the loss of genius. Or anybody, perhaps. I don't want to be a cynic. But maybe it's too late for that.

Kathy Rogers said...

Well, you can count me among the don't-get-its and don't-cares. Sorry, but I'm mystified by the beatification.

And, yes, I do have an Apple computer. Not that that should make any difference.

Springer Kneeblood said...

I count Jobs among those rare people...like Albert Einstein, Galileo Galilei, Charles Darwin, and Issac Newton...whose positive contributions to society are of such magnitude that they merit respect and appreciation. I do not "beatify" the man, nor do I loathe him for his creative genius.

Springer Kneeblood said...

By the way, I have an iPhone, but not an Apple computer. Not that it should matter. 8=)

bev said...

I would not want to beatify Jobs either, and I am quite sure he would detest such a thing. No, it is just that in the whoke scheme pf things, I have a lot of respect for his influence on the technology that we use. As one tech guru wrote in one of the few opinion pieces I read last week, Jobs put together the people who would design an experience aimed to please the user, and not just something that was only "good enough" to sell. He also showed that it was not a mistake to risk development costs in order to design what is dreamed - and to be ahead if the curve in what we would find useful. I am not "sad" over his death as it does not impact me personally - certainoy not at alll in the way that my husband's death by cancer has impacted me. But as an aside, I must admit to feeling my usual desire to kick cancer's sorry ass for cutting short the life of another young person who otherwise probably would have gone on to live many productive years. It is happening so often lately, that I think we do experience these deaths personally. I feel that is why Canadians were so saddened ti see the opposition keader, Jack Layton, die from cancer a few weeks ago. Goddamn cancer win again.

Unfortunately, from a technological point of view, I do feel that Job's death may mark a turning point in the industry. Those designers who dream may find less opportunity to take the risks needed to turn invention into reaity.

As for seeing Jobs as a celebrity, I don't think of him that way, but when I compare him to all of the current politicians, movie, tv, and music personalities that people obsess over, I believe he has done more to make a positive impact on our day to day lives interacting with the world, than all of the frivolous and infuriating crap that is going on in the world today. thus my comparison to this whole Michael Jackson inquiry, the Sarah Palin story, and all of the other BS that frequently makes the news foepr week after horrible week in america these days. Perhaps that is what some people are mourning - the passing of a very intelligent man who actually worked hard, and inspired those he worked with to change our world in what, to many, is a positive way - not just within the states, but around the world. For once, people around the globe were able to take a moment to agree that here was a person who actually made a difference in our lives in at least some small but positive way.